Divya PANDEY, PhD in Environmental Science (India)

Pandey Divya

Divya holds a PhD in Environmental Science from the Banaras Hindu University, India. Her research assessed the sustainability of cultivation practices and stigmatises the carbon footprints of different agricultural systems in the Indo-Gagnetic plains.

Current position: Research Associate at Stockholm Environment Institute, York.

Research focus: Interaction of agriculture with climate change. Main running project: Assessing ozone risk on soil carbon sequestration

She aims to identify new practices, to gain better economic returns, conserve resources, and help manage global warming more effectively, while also improving those currently in place. She is also investigating the impact of ozone pollution on carbon sequestration in cropland soils.

She was awarded a Green Talent in 2013 for her application-oriented research, which helps agriculture with the challenge of ensuring food security while also reducing environmental damage. The contacts made during her stay in Germany, helped her in applying for post-doctoral projects and eventually secured her a Leibniz DAAD Post Doctoral Fellowship at the Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research in Müncheberg, Germany.

2015 Leibniz DAAD Post Doctoral Fellowship Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF)
2014 Indian Science Congress Association's Young Scientist Award in Environmental Sciences


CV as submitted for the Green Talents award (2013):

DEPARMENT OF BOTANY, BANARAS HINDU UNIVERSITY, INDIA

Research focus: Estimation of Carbon Footprints of different agricultural systems

Sustainability tackles issues in different forms and sizes. Humans impact the environment in many different ways. Divya Pandey decided to put her mind to making agriculture more sustainable in India.

Since 2008, Divya Pandey has been enrolled in a PhD programme in Environmental Science. As part of her research she is assessing the sustainability of cultivation practices and estimating the carbon footprints of different agricultural systems in the Indo-Gagnetic plains. As she puts it: “Contemporary agriculture is facing the dual challenge of ensuring food security and reducing environmental damage. Hence, to ensure sustained development, it is essential to compare different agricultural practices and identify those which give better economic returns, conserve resources, and help manage global warming more effectively.” Her research follows two major research objectives: the screening of better cultivation practices and improving the practices currently in place.

Pandey is no stranger to sustainability. Her previous studies have prepared her well for the challenges of sustainable research and have honed her skills to succeed in her current endeavours. She studied sociological and scientific aspects of pollution control in the river Ganges, as well as urban air quality for her Master’s projects. “I strive to contribute sincerely to sustainable agriculture,” says Pandey.

Additionally, Pandey is striving to bridge the gap between science and the masses. She writes articles and her own findings in popular science journals both in Hindi and English.

The jury praised Pandey’s extensive comparison of different systems of rice cultivation in terms of productivity, soil quality, carbon footprints and carbon sequestration. In addition, the jury highlighted its appreciation of the application oriented and integrated approach of Pandey’s research.